Perineal Ectopic Testis: A Rare Case of Congenital Anomaly

S. N. Jatal *

Jatal Hospital and Research Centre, Latur, India.

Sudhir Jatal

Jatal Hospital and Research Centre, Latur, Tata Hospital, Mumbai, India.

Supriya Jatal

Fellow in Clinical Nephrology, MGM Hospital & College, Navi Mumbai, India.

Shubhangi Jatal

HBT hospital, Jogeshwari, Mumbai, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Perineal ectopic testis is an uncommon congenital anomaly observed in less than 1% of undescended testis cases. Typically, it arises from either an overdeveloped lengthening of a segment of the gubernaculum or an obstruction at the entrance to the scrotum. Diagnosis is usually straightforward through a physical examination of the ectopic regions and an empty scrotum on the same side. While imaging techniques such as ultrasonography and tomography may rarely be necessary, it is predominantly identified during childhood, with its occurrence being even rarer in adults and young boys. The recommended and widely accepted treatment for perineal ectopic testis is open orchiopexy.

We present a 5 years boy with empty left scrotum and there was a palpable left testicle in the left perineum, which confirmed by ultrasonography. Left dartos pouch orchidopexy done though inguinal incision.

Keywords: Perineal ectopic testis, cryptorchidism, orchiopexy


How to Cite

Jatal, S. N., Jatal , S., Jatal , S., & Jatal , S. (2024). Perineal Ectopic Testis: A Rare Case of Congenital Anomaly. Asian Journal of Research in Surgery, 7(1), 46–49. Retrieved from https://journalajrs.com/index.php/AJRS/article/view/191

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